Author: Estrella Gallardo

800 Filipino lives lost everyday, 30 every hour due to “silent disaster”

In the Philippines, Dans said “no epidemic, no tsunami, no earthquake comes close” to the 800 daily deaths from non-communicable disease (NCDs) “It is a disease of the young” he said.Academician Antonio Miguel L. Dans, focal person and member of the National Academy of Science and Technology (NAST) raised the alarm on the NCDs in his paper presented “Introduction to Non-Communicable Diseases.” NAST President Academician William G. Padolina cited the “quite alarming…tens of millions” deaths worldwide, considering a World Health Organization (WHO) report in 2008 alone. “The Deaths” registered occurred before the age of 60, the most productive period in our lives,” he said. The NCD’s figure continues to rise, with the low – and – middle – income countries having the most number of cases, he added. The epidemic of NCD such as stroke, heart disease, chronic obstruction pulmonary disease and cancer among others was discussed with experts and the five national scientists during the Roundtable Discussion (RTD) on Health Beyond Health Care: Changing the Mindset for the control of NCDs. The RTD which tackled the extent of the health problem, its causes, and how to prevent them, was conducted by Department of Science and Technology’s (DOST), National Academy of Science and Technology (NAST) on August 19, 2014 at Hyatt Hotel Manila. Our country is confronted with the NCDs epidemic that the scientific community has failed to anticipate...

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NSTW Presents NAST 2014 Awardees

  The Department of Science and Technology (DOST) presented the National Academy of Science and Technology (NAST) awardees at the DOST 2014 NSTW on July 25 (2nd day of the 5-day NSTW) held at the SMX Convention, Mall of Asia (MOA), Pasay City. The awards and awardees are the following: *Outstanding Research and Development Award for Basic Research (Eduardo A. Quisumbing Medal): Grecebio Jonathan D. Alejandro, Ph.D., Research Center for the Natural and Applied Sciences, College of Science and the Graduate School, University of Sto. Thomas, in recognition of his pioneering research on “Molecular phylogeny and taxonomic revision of the Philippine endemic Villaria Rolfe (Rubiaceae)” which established the classification of the little known Rubiaceae genus Villaria through molecular markers and documented the morphology and conservation status of all its species including a novel species Villarialeytensis. Dr. Eduardo A. Quisumbing was an outstanding botanist, orchidologist, administrator, conservationist, curator, science writer, and educator. He has studied many Philippine plants and published them. He was also the Father of Philippine Orchidology and a conservationist of the Philippine Herbarium. *Outstanding Research and Development Award for Applied Research (Julian A. Banzon Medal): Rhodora V. Azanza, Ph.D., Marine Science Institute, UP Diliman, in recognition of her outstanding research leadership on the program “Detection and Mitigation of Technology and Early Warning System for Philippine Harmful Algal Blossoms (HABTech) and Molecular Studies of HAB Causative Organisms and...

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PCAARRD Recommends Farm Practices for Chicken during Extended dry spell

The low water supply as a result of the dry season in the country officially declared by the Philippine Atmospheric Geographical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) this year, the Philippine Council for Agriculture, Aquatic and Natural Resources, Research and Development (PCAARRD) of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) offers science and technology (S&T) options for poultry and livestock raisers.           S&T options are drought resistance and drought avoidance strategies to mitigate the effect of inadequate water supply from the dry period.           A hot environment can cause discomfort and stress in farm animals which commonly reduced productivity or mortality. Stress, in general, can lower the animals’ resistance or immune competence, thus making them more susceptible to diseases.           An animal that is under stress will perform poorly-less gain in weight, lower milk production, lower egg production, or higher incidence of reproductive failures as the case may be.           Farmers cannot do much about long periods of dry spell except to relieve the animals from the extremely hot weather.           The following are practical tips that animal raisers can do to reduce the negative effects of heat stress for chicken.           • Provide cool drinking water at all times to prevent dehydration and to help them regulate body temperature.           •Allow maximum air circulation or ventilation inside the house and pens.           •Insulate galvanized iron (GI) roofing with appropriate...

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First drought tolerant peanut variety available in the country

Early El Nino phenomenon this year was warned by the experts of climate since drought is a global issue, scientists from worldwide are developing strategies to predict and mitigate its impact.           Researchers at the Philippine Council for Agriculture, Aquatic and Natural Resources and Development (PCAARRD) of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) funded “Peanut Seed Security Support Program in Region 2” were able to identify a drought tolerant peanut variety.           Since drought and hot temperature are usually experienced in Cagayan Valley, researchers conducted several field trials on some selected peanut varieties in the said area and also addressed the farmers’ want and need for improved and drought tolerant varieties.           The research team identified and recommended the ICGV 95390 as the first drought tolerant peanut variety in the Philippines, commercially known as G.D Lasam PRIDE, earlier registered with the National Seed Industry Council as NSIC Pn 17.           The program team also developed a package of technology for confectionary varieties and wet season production aside from identifying G.D. Lasam PRIDE as the country’s first peanut variety that is tolerant –to drought.           During dry season, G.D. Lasam PRIDE has a bean yield of 1,711 kilograms per hectare, pod yield of 2,182 kilograms per hectare, and shelling recovery of 72.5 percent. Its high yield makes it desirable for production.           G.D. Lasam has large, pink seeds that...

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NAST Awards Twelve Outstanding Young Scientists

The National Academy of Science and Technology, Philippines (NASTPhil) of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) awarded twelve Outstanding Young Scientists (OYS) during its 86th Annual Scientific Meeting (ASM) on June 9-10, 2014 at the Philippine International Convention Center (PICC), Manila. Part of the two-day programs were the recognition ceremonies for the following awards: OYS, NAST Environmental Award, TWAS Prize for Young Scientists in the Philippines, NAST Talent Search for Young Scientists, Outstanding Books and Monograph, Outstanding Scientific Papers, and Best Scientific Poster Award. The awarded OYS were Glenn Banaguas, Masteral in Environmental Management, De La Salle, Araneta University; Rommel C. Sulabo, Ph. D. Animal Science, University of the Philippines, Los Banos; Ian Kendrich C. Fontanilla, Ph.D., Genetics, University of the Philippines, Diliman; Karl Marx A. Quiazon, Ph.D., Aquatic Biosciences, Central Luzon State University; Richard S. Lemence, Ph.D., Mathematics, University of the Philippines Diliman; May T. Lim, Ph.D., Applied Physics, University of the Philippines Diliman; Jessie Pascual P. Bitog, Ph.D., Agricultural and Rural System Engineering, Nueva Viscaya State University; Rhoda B. Leron, Ph.D., Chemical Engineering, Mapua Institute of Technology; Paolo Antonio S. Silva, M.D, Ophthalmology University of the Philippines Manila; John Mark S, Velasco, M.D., Public Health, AFP Medical Center; Geoffrey M. Decones, Ph.D., Economics, University of the Philippines Diliman; Analyn Salvador-Amores, Ph.D., Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of the Philippines Baguio. TWAS PRIZE Young Scientists in the...

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SEARCA Launches Book SOCIOECONOMIC IMPACT OF Bt EGGPLANT

A book titled SOCIOECONOMIC IMPACTS Bt EGGPLANT Ex-ante Case Studies in the Philippines was launched by SEARCA, ISAAA and ABSP II at the Dusit Thani Hotel, Makati City on February 6, 2014. SEARCA stands for Southeast Asian Regional Center for graduate Study and Research in Agriculture headed by Director Dr. Gil C. Saguiguit, Jr. , ISAAA for International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Application headed by Director Dr. Randy A. Haurea and ABSP II for Agricultural Biotechnology Support Project II headed by Director Dr. Frank A. Shotkoski . The book presents the findings of completed ex-ante studies on the market prospect and potential economic, health and environmental impacts of Bt eggplant in the Philippines. The analyses are complimented by studies on pesticide use, cost and return of conventional eggplant production and supply chains in eggplant marketing. All studies were conducted in major eggplant producing provinces in the country namely: Sta. Maria, Pangasinan; Tanauan, Batangas; and Tiaong, Quezon and used both primary and secondary data and information. Pangasinan and Quezon belong to the top eggplant producing provinces. Since 2000, eggplant production in the Philippines has been increasing despite with only a relatively slight increase in the area planted and had increased production in 2000-2009 by 2.1% per annum. Asia produces 87% of the world eggplant (Solanum melongene L.) and amounts for 90% of the world’s production area. The Philippines...

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Utilization of Mango Peels as Source of Pectin

Utilization of Mango Peels as Source of Pectin In a project titled “Utilization of Mango Peels as Source of Pectin,” the Philippine Carabao Mango was found to contain high pectin. Pectin is a naturally-occurring polysaccharide found in berries, apples, and other fruits consumption of which showed to reduce blood cholesterol levels. As a group of carbohydrates, pectin is used mainly as a pharmaceutical ingredient in drug suspension and emulsion, wound healing preparations, medical and denture adhesives, and even in lozenges. In cosmetics, it is used as a stabilizer, as a natural texture powder for paste, ointment, oils, and creams. Pectin is also used in hair tonic, shampoo and body lotion. It is also safe as a food additive in jams, jellies, marmalades, yogurt, and baked products. In 2011, data from the Department of Trade and Industry showed that the Philippines imported about 95 kilos of pectin valued at about $52.4 million. The cost of imported pectin is estimated at around P27, 000 per kilogram. The study on mango peels was a joint undertaking of the Department of Agriculture’s Philippine Center for Postharvest Development and Mechanization (PhilMech), and the Department of Science and Technology’s Industrial Technology Development Institute (ITDI) conducted by Ma. Cristina B. Gragasin, Aileen R. Ligisin, Rosalinda C. Torres, and Romulo R. Estrella, was conceptualized as an earth-and-money saving research. The research significantly provided a unique extraction process...

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